Cialis: A History

There is no shortage of drugs on the market to assist with erectile dysfunction. You could probably name a few of them right now. How, then, did Cialis become one of the first names people think of in regards to erectile dysfunction aid? There are so many out there, so how and why did Cialis come about, and what makes it so special?

Like any drug, Cialis has an interesting beginning, and its history has led all the way up to today, where Cialis is one of the most prescribed medications on the market for ED treatment, as well as for a few other conditions that can be treated by Tadalafil. Here is the story of Cialis.

 

Owning the Market

From the late 1990s until 2003, Pfizer enjoyed a monopoly on the market for erectile dysfunction aids. For five years, they made billions of dollars by selling the only available ED aid at the time, Viagra. Then, in 2003, both Levitra and Cialis were approved for distribution by the FDA, and suddenly Viagra was not alone.

The “Real” Beginning

In actuality, 2003 was the “official” beginning of Cialis, but the studies and science began nearly a decade earlier. In the early 1990s, the pharmaceutical company Icos wondered about the effects of inhibiting PDE5, which is the enzyme that destroys cGMP (cGMP is released during sexual arousal in men, relaxing the blood vessels and allowing the formation of an erection).

The initial studies of the PDE5 inhibitor called the substance IC351, and their studies began in 1993. This discovery of inhibiting PDE5 to help with blood flow is the basis for all of the erectile dysfunction aids, including Viagra. Oddly enough, only a year later, researchers at Pfizer (the company that began marketing Viagra) discovered the substance Sildenafil citrate, which caused erections in patients who were undergoing clinical trials for the drug to help with heart problems.

Presumably, Icos was not on a mission to create an erectile dysfunction aid. More than likely, they were simply wondering about the effects of inhibiting PDE5, and how it affects or restricts blood flow in the body as a whole. However, they soon discovered that their IC351 had a similar effect to Pfizer’s Sildenafil citrate, and they found themselves in an entirely new ball game.

Science, Patents, and Creation

In 1994, Icos was granted a patent on their drug IC351. It is unknown whether the patent was granted prior to or after Pfizer’s discovery of Sildenafil citrate, but either way, in 1995, Icos began clinical studies. The first two years of trials were considered phase I, and phase II began in 1997. Phase II marked the first time that IC351 was tested on patients with erectile dysfunction, which is presumably where the discovery was made of its usefulness.

In 1998, Icos joined forces with another drug company called Eli Lilly and Co. The newly formed partnership began to commercialize their discovery as a treatment for sexual dysfunction. In 2000, the company finally filed their new drug with the FDA in the United States, and renamed IC351 to Cialis, the name it goes by still today.

Final Phase

In Phase III, the new Cialis results concluded that the active ingredient, Tadalafil, remained in the system for up to 36 hours after dosage. It also revealed that the drug continued working during that time, not just the initial intake period. Icos and Lilly presented their findings at a major conference in Orlando, Florida in 2002, the 97th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association. From there, Cialis truly began to take on new life, eventually leading to its official FDA approval in late 2003.

Prior to the FDA approval, though, Cialis was approved and released in Europe in November of 2002, with resounding success. This success and the final phase of clinical trials left to the FDA approval and distribution of Cialis in November of 2003, a year later.

More Than Just Sex

Tadalafil – and Cialis – were known solely for the erectile dysfunction treatment from 2003 to 2009. In 2009, it was discovered that the drug Tadalafil can also be used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension, or PAH. However, Cialis sells Tadalafil for the treatment of PAH under the name of Adcirca, but the active ingredient is the same.

Furthermore, in 2011, Cialis also received approval from the FDA for use in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. Cialis can be used to treat men suffering from erectile dysfunction, BPH, or even both. Whatever the case, patients experience significant improvement with the use of Cialis.

The Better Choice

For so many reasons, Cialis is conclusively the better choice on the market for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. It lasts far longer than the main competition – 36 hours in comparison to 4 hours – and Tadalafil offers more benefits than its competitors as well. It is a more “natural” option, as it does not create erections – instead, it just facilitates in maintaining an erection. Sexual arousal is needed for an erection, but with Cialis, you can bet that you will have far less trouble “keeping it up”.

Cialis must be prescribed, but it can be taken daily or as needed, to fit your needs and lifestyle. In the opinion of countless medical professionals, Cialis is one of the safest, most affordable, and most progressive treatments for erectile dysfunctions that the market has ever seen, and it will continue to serve its purpose for years to come.

Cialis may not enjoy the brand name recognition of Viagra, but you can be certain that it enjoys the successful nature of its usage. Perhaps someday in the future, our first response to “erectile dysfunction” will be Cialis instead of the other guys. Whatever the case may be, it is without a doubt true that Cialis is far and away the best option for those suffering from ED.

With humble but interesting beginnings and multi-serviceable purpose, Cialis is sure to be a long lasting drug for years to come. If you think you could benefit from Cialis, be sure to consult with your doctor, and know that Cialis is safe, progressive, and well-loved by medical professionals and patients alike.

About James KinrossDr. James Kinross is a consultant colorectal surgeon, at St. Mary's Hospital London. His clinical interests are in minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery for the treatment of colorectal cancer. He also has an interest in surgical nutrition and modulation of the gut microbiota by pro and prebiotics for improved operative outcomes. He was trained in Northwest London, and he was an NIHR Clinical Lecturer in Surgery and an Ethicon Laparoscopic Fellow in Colorectal Surgery. He was awarded a Royal College of Surgeons of England training fellowship during his PhD and he was funded by the Academy of Medical Sciences as an early stage lecturer. He is a visiting Professor at the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland. He is currently funded by Bowel and Cancer research and the Imperial BRC.James Kinross Facebook James Kinross Google Plus James Kinross Twitter James Kinross Medium James Kinross Wordpress James Kinross Blogger